I-80 expansion between Omaha/Lincoln

Trains, Planes, and Automobiles (and Streetcars!).

Moderators: Coyote, Omaha Cowboy, Brad, nebugeater

User avatar
nebugeater
County Board
Posts: 6152
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2004 6:07 pm
Location: Gretna NE

Postby nebugeater » Fri Dec 29, 2006 11:00 am

Aren't there tolls on I70 through Kansas?  What makes this different?  I understand they are not happening and I do not think it would be good but I am not clear on the Diff between I70 and I80 in regards to tolls?

the1wags
County Board
Posts: 3902
Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 7:43 pm
Location: Denver
Contact:

Postby the1wags » Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:07 pm

Yes there are plenty of tollways out there. I'm guessing ( I don't know) that any tollway(Kansas, I88 through Illinois) was designed and built as such, and that you can't make existing interstate roads tollways. Anybody that wants to dig into the law feel free.

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Fri Dec 29, 2006 5:39 pm

The process of making an existing Interstate into a tolling highway is for a State DOT to submit to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) an "Expression on Interest" to toll. This application would address several questions about the facility of interest, including the justification, a description of how tolls would be collected, a timetable, a guarantee that enforcement, maintenance, and electronic toll collection would be enacted, a guarantee to measure the effectiveness of the program, a list of public (or private/public) agencies that would operate it, and a plan to reinvest or reimburse the tolls collected to pay for the project, the construction, or the debt incurred.

Upon receipt of an Expression of Interest, the FHWA will review it. If everything is ok, then the FHWA will recommend to "slot" the request to the most appropriate program office that will make the official approval, or will ask for more detail.  If finally approved, the FHWA program office will execute a memorandum of agreement between the State (agency) and the FHWA that will detail the criteria, requirements, and methods that will be expected by both parties to operate the facility, etc.

A more detailed description of the Expression of Interest process is on http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/tolling_pricing/index.htm

About 6 opportunities (programs) exist for States to gain approval. At base-level, States require approval from FHWA to toll Interstate facilities that are maintained by States, but still fall under purview of FHWA by reason of funding (Federal-aid, etc.) and federal oversight implications.  Depending on which program a State DOT will seek, there are differing criteria. But overall, there must be a justifiable reason to toll, be it to reduce "high" congestion in a corridor, reduce emissions to meet regional air quality reg's, finance construction or related work, test ("pilot") a new strategy, retire debt incurred by a public/private partnership to build facilities, or similar. Tolling approval is not granted lightly, but rather must meet a rigorous checklist of warrants, criteria, and justification. Historically, tolls were fixed-price fees that were collected at tollbooths. In recent years, tolling has expanded to include variable pricing (higher fees during higher congested times), variable timing (on or off during peak hours), and use of cashless systems (toll cards).  One system that is gaining more favor is to allow single drivers to pay to use high occupancy lanes that would otherwise exclude them . These high occupancy toll (HOT) lanes are very topical these days.

For more information one can search "Tolling" or "Pricing" on the FHWA website http://www.fhwa.dot.gov
Image

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Sat Nov 03, 2007 12:46 am

[font=Georgia]Interstate Project Delayed By 3 Years
Federal Funds Cut, Governor Says[/font]


Omaha World Herald wrote:The state said on Friday that federal budget cuts mean drivers will have to put up with the construction for three more years than expected -- until 2013. The Nebraska Department of Roads projects that Nebraska will see a $114 million loss in federal highway funding next year alone. Gov. Dave Heineman said it doesn't look good in the years beyond, either.
Image

Bryan1117
Home Owners Association
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:30 pm
Location: Omaha, NE (Millard)

Postby Bryan1117 » Mon Nov 05, 2007 4:47 pm

Another 3 years? I had no idea that gas tax revenue was so far down. I thought demand for gasoline was way up in the United States, that is why the oil companies continually "jack up" gas prices. Just another reason why the money being spent on widening I-80 should have been spent on a transit rail line or something similar.

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3472
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:21 pm

Bryan1117 wrote:Another 3 years? I had no idea that gas tax revenue was so far down. I thought demand for gasoline was way up in the United States, that is why the oil companies continually "jack up" gas prices. Just another reason why the money being spent on widening I-80 should have been spent on a transit rail line or something similar.


Demand is up a little bit in the U.S., but up greatly world wide, which is why the crude price has doubled in the past year.  Tax on fuel in the US is a tiny fraction of what it is in most of the developed world.  Prices for fuel in Europe are the equivalent of $5-$7 a gallon.  Their citizens have much better roads AND much better public transportation, such as high speed railways.  The US has become a second class nation when you look at transportation infrastructure.  It doesn't have to be this way.  Football isn't the only way we have gravitated toward mediocrity.

User avatar
Swift
Planning Board
Posts: 2944
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: NYC

Postby Swift » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:25 pm

It's very much a chicken and egg paradox though. The reason people are willing to pay such a high price for the luxury of driving is because the other means of transportation mean that those who can't afford that high price can still easily get around.

How do you implement an comprehensive mass transit system in an tax-phobic country like America 2007?

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3472
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Mon Nov 05, 2007 11:17 pm

Swift wrote:It's very much a chicken and egg paradox though. The reason people are willing to pay such a high price for the luxury of driving is because the other means of transportation mean that those who can't afford that high price can still easily get around.

How do you implement an comprehensive mass transit system in an tax-phobic country like America 2007?


You elect a president and a congress with backbone and a vision of the future.  Oh!  Never mind.....

User avatar
Swift
Planning Board
Posts: 2944
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: NYC

Postby Swift » Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:19 am

nativeomahan wrote:
Swift wrote:It's very much a chicken and egg paradox though. The reason people are willing to pay such a high price for the luxury of driving is because the other means of transportation mean that those who can't afford that high price can still easily get around.

How do you implement an comprehensive mass transit system in an tax-phobic country like America 2007?


You elect a president and a congress with backbone and a vision of the future.  Oh!  Never mind.....


Try getting rid of Info-tainment News Networks first.

We expect our candidates to give sound-bite answers, yet then we are surprised when they have sound-bite policies. :what:

icejammer
County Board
Posts: 3597
Joined: Tue Oct 05, 2004 11:39 am
Location: Council Bluffs

Postby icejammer » Tue Nov 06, 2007 8:40 am

Swift wrote:It's very much a chicken and egg paradox though. The reason people are willing to pay such a high price for the luxury of driving is because the other means of transportation mean that those who can't afford that high price can still easily get around.

How do you implement an comprehensive mass transit system in an tax-phobic country like America 2007?



AND....much of the US is not nearly as densely populated as the European countries, making mass transportation more costly on a per-unit basis, leading to higher taxes.  Unfortunately, much of the population isn't bright enough to figure that out (darn that public school education anyway!   :;): )
"Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved."

--William Jennings Bryan

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3472
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Tue Nov 06, 2007 9:23 pm

Europe has about 728,000,000 people (and dropping!) living over 3.9 million square miles.  The US has 302,000,000 living in 3.8 million square miles, but about half of the population lives east of the Mississippi river, which is a bit over 1 million sq. miles.  So the eastern third of the US has a similar population density to Europe.  We could easily afford to build a world class high speed rail system throughout the relatively flat eastern third of the US, with a few lines reaching westward to population centers.  I should say we could do this if we weren't throwing money down sewer holes in Iraq, Pakistan, etc.

icejammer
County Board
Posts: 3597
Joined: Tue Oct 05, 2004 11:39 am
Location: Council Bluffs

Postby icejammer » Wed Nov 07, 2007 6:20 pm

nativeomahan wrote:I should say we could do this if we weren't throwing money down sewer holes in Iraq, Pakistan, etc.


We weren't putting money into public transportation before, so why would we expect things to be different when we stop "throwing money down sewer holes"?
"Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved."

--William Jennings Bryan

omaja
Library Board
Posts: 264
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 7:43 pm
Location: Boston

Postby omaja » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:22 pm

Lest you forget, oil is something like three times as expensive as it was before we started throwing money down the drain.  If the price of oil doesn't give way, the airlines will eventually have to react with capacity cuts and fare increases.  And what do we have to fall back on?  Oh yeah, right, the Interstate system!  We know how well our freeways are maintained in this country.  Some regions of the US would be better served by rail anyway (namely Boston-New York-Philadelphia-Baltimore-Washington, San Francisco-Los Angeles-San Diego-Las Vegas, and the Midwest focusing around Chicago, including Omaha, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Saint Louis, Cleveland, Detroit, Cincinnati, etc.).

Seriously, here we are, spending more than a billion dollars to turn I-80/I-29 through Council Bluffs into a 12+-lane monster freeway, and for what?  To make someone's commute from Council Bluffs to West Omaha easier?  The Interstate system was not intended to shuttle local traffic; it has deviated greatly from its original purpose, one look at Germany and that becomes obvious.  Whereas Germany and other countries invested in urban, regional and national rail systems (in addition to regional and national freeway networks), the US decided to rip through city centers, divide neighborhoods, and pave over houses with ugly concrete messes, promoting the apparent "freedom" of owning a car.

If high oil prices are what it takes to shift our priorities from the bottomless pit of federally-funded freeways to sustainable mass transportation, I hope things continue deteriorating as they have been.  :;):

Something has got to give, and I think slowly the US as a whole is starting to realize this.  Albeit at a painfully slow pace.

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Thu Nov 08, 2007 12:10 am

omaja wrote:If high oil prices are what it takes to shift our priorities from the bottomless pit of federally-funded freeways to sustainable mass transportation, I hope things continue deteriorating as they have been.  :;):


It sure would be nice if things could deteriorate without so many people getting killed, though.

-Big E
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

icejammer
County Board
Posts: 3597
Joined: Tue Oct 05, 2004 11:39 am
Location: Council Bluffs

Postby icejammer » Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:51 am

While I fully appreciate and largely agree with what you're saying Omaja, the simple fact is that mass public transportation is waaaaaay down the list of priorities within the transportation spectrum.  I think we have something like a need for $100 billion annually just to repair and operate all our nation's road, while we only spend about 60% of that - that $40 billion backlog in annual deferred maintenance and construction isn't going away anytime soon.  Throw in then the competition for dollars for other infrastructure needs (prime example - combined sewer problem in Omaha to the tune of $1.5 billion) and it's clear to me that the dollars aren't going to be there in the quantities needed for mass transportation anytime soon (unless the people of this country suddenly decide they can pay double in taxes what they presently do and the politician's have the backbone to do it).

Yes, in a perfect world, we would have all the money we need to attend to our every wish and need, but we're in a far from perfect world.

(and fyi - the I-80/29 rebuild in CB is being driven largely due to 3 factors  - i) current system is not up to current transportation standards,ii) entire system is beyond it's design life, and iii) large traffic count of through traffic (i.e. truck traffic).  Reducing commuting time is not a primary driver in the project.)
"Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved."

--William Jennings Bryan

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:50 am

$5 gas in California:

http://www.theksbwchannel.com/news/14536489/detail.html

Americans wrote:All Hail the Great and Powerful Automobile, whose power from on high makes me incapable of making rational decisions, other than to calculate how many groceries I can haul in one trip.


-Big E
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

omaja
Library Board
Posts: 264
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 7:43 pm
Location: Boston

Postby omaja » Fri Nov 09, 2007 3:00 pm

icejammer wrote:While I fully appreciate and largely agree with what you're saying Omaja, the simple fact is that mass public transportation is waaaaaay down the list of priorities within the transportation spectrum.  I think we have something like a need for $100 billion annually just to repair and operate all our nation's road, while we only spend about 60% of that - that $40 billion backlog in annual deferred maintenance and construction isn't going away anytime soon.  Throw in then the competition for dollars for other infrastructure needs (prime example - combined sewer problem in Omaha to the tune of $1.5 billion) and it's clear to me that the dollars aren't going to be there in the quantities needed for mass transportation anytime soon (unless the people of this country suddenly decide they can pay double in taxes what they presently do and the politician's have the backbone to do it).

Yes, in a perfect world, we would have all the money we need to attend to our every wish and need, but we're in a far from perfect world.

(and fyi - the I-80/29 rebuild in CB is being driven largely due to 3 factors  - i) current system is not up to current transportation standards,ii) entire system is beyond it's design life, and iii) large traffic count of through traffic (i.e. truck traffic).  Reducing commuting time is not a primary driver in the project.)


Perhaps it is just me, but that seems like all the more reason to pursue other transportation methods.  Just think what a high-speed rail line could do along the East Coast.  The benefits of such a line would far outweigh the costs: East Coast freeways are congested and airports are at or well above capacity, something needs to be done.  For example, the FAA is about to slot restrict JFK, LaGuardia is already slot restricted, and Newark is one (if not the most) of the most severely delayed airports in the country; mix all of this with rising air traffic across the eastern seaboard and you have a recipe for disaster.  Connect Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington with dedicated rail and it would result in reduced delays due to a drop in the number of wasteful regional flights, and it would lessen the burden on freeways, prolonging their lifespans.  All of that from an isolated East Coast system.  Extend that across the country and the savings would be enormous.  Even though there is a huge deficit in road maintenance, that should not be made up with more spending on roads when that money could be better utilized elsewhere.  Trying to make up for that deficit, or even continuing with the status quo will only serve to prop up an already failing network.  What good will that do?

I see where you are coming from, but the US really needs someone with a vision to put rail into motion in a big way.  If not, freeways will continue to crumble, people will continue waste hundreds and thousands of hours yearly stuck in traffic and in airports, and we will be left with nothing to turn to.  We need a well-rounded infrastructure network, and we have to start somewhere.  Continuing this course will, at best, put a Band-Aid on the situation.  At best.

BTW, I am fully aware that making commutes easier is not the primary reason for I-80/I-29. :;):  However, local traffic is what has caused that section of freeway to become congested.  Granted, yes, I-80/I-29 is substandard in construction, but it would not be beyond its capacity lifespan if there weren't the glut of local traffic using it (if that weren't the case, I-80 would be widened along much of its transcontinental journey).  Additionally, expanding it to 12 lanes only adds to the maintenance deficit without offering much in long term relief.  It is perpetuating the cyclical black hole of roads funding.

User avatar
Brad
City Council
Posts: 28557
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:03 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby Brad » Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:54 pm

Interstate 80 between Omaha and Lincoln is nearly complete

http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2 ... d=10223121

Construction work on Interstate 80 between Omaha and Lincoln is now mostly complete.

Starting Friday, new eastbound lanes will be open to traffic on a four-mile stretch from the Mahoney State Park exit to Ruff Road. Work will continue through the Platte River area on bridge rails, striping and other improvements.

New westbound lanes will open next week after concrete barriers are removed.
Image
Omaha Skyline Photos, Omaha Aerial Photos, and More.
http://www.bradwilliamsphotography.com
http://www.facebook.com/bradwilliamsphotography
@bradwphoto on Twitter
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce Member

User avatar
Brad
City Council
Posts: 28557
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:03 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby Brad » Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:55 pm

How does that equal nearly complete.... isn't that 1/2 way?
Image
Omaha Skyline Photos, Omaha Aerial Photos, and More.
http://www.bradwilliamsphotography.com
http://www.facebook.com/bradwilliamsphotography
@bradwphoto on Twitter
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce Member

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:01 pm

That was as far as this phase of the project intended to go. With highway funds at a low I don't know how they are going to prioritize further projects.
Image

User avatar
Brad
City Council
Posts: 28557
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:03 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby Brad » Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:02 pm

I took it as "Omaha TO Lincoln" reading the headline and opening sentence...
Image
Omaha Skyline Photos, Omaha Aerial Photos, and More.
http://www.bradwilliamsphotography.com
http://www.facebook.com/bradwilliamsphotography
@bradwphoto on Twitter
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce Member

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:06 pm

[font=Georgia]Portion of I-80 project completed early[/font]

Omaha World Herald wrote:The $45 million construction project, begun in August 2005, is finishing nine months ahead of schedule. The contractor, Hawkins Construction Co. of Omaha, will collect about $1 million in incentives for early completion. Hawkins also received a total of $1.26 million in bonuses for beating deadlines on the West Dodge Expressway construction. The goal of widening I-80 to six lanes between Omaha and Lincoln by 2012 has been pushed back to 2014 because of federal funding deficiencies, Mueting said. About 30 miles between the Mahoney exit and Lincoln remain to be widened.
Image

Bryan1117
Home Owners Association
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:30 pm
Location: Omaha, NE (Millard)

Postby Bryan1117 » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:16 pm

Just wanted to update you guys. On my trip from Omaha to Lincoln and then back today, the crews have removed the concrete barriers and the NEW Eastbound I-80 and new Platte River Eastbound bridge is open. And my favorite, the 55 MPH Speed Limit is gone again, and back to 65 at least for a while until they finish up the rest of the work around the new lanes. Still only two lanes open both directions but a much easier stretch to navigate.

User avatar
nebugeater
County Board
Posts: 6152
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2004 6:07 pm
Location: Gretna NE

Postby nebugeater » Sun Jan 13, 2008 5:45 pm

Bryan1117 wrote:Just wanted to update you guys. On my trip from Omaha to Lincoln and then back today, the crews have removed the concrete barriers and the NEW Eastbound I-80 and new Platte River Eastbound bridge is open. And my favorite, the 55 MPH Speed Limit is gone again, and back to 65 at least for a while until they finish up the rest of the work around the new lanes. Still only two lanes open both directions but a much easier stretch to navigate.


Better watch your driving.  I was through there three times this weekend and the W bound lanes are still definitely 55 MPH.  Along with the signs they have a flashing message board proclaiming the 55 MPH speed limit.

User avatar
Brad
City Council
Posts: 28557
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:03 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby Brad » Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:33 am

Real nice that the entire interstate from Gretna to the Lincoln airport is a "construction zone"...
Image
Omaha Skyline Photos, Omaha Aerial Photos, and More.
http://www.bradwilliamsphotography.com
http://www.facebook.com/bradwilliamsphotography
@bradwphoto on Twitter
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce Member

User avatar
SabrinaFaire
Home Owners Association
Posts: 182
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2008 9:20 am
Location: SW Omaha

Postby SabrinaFaire » Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:43 am

Brad wrote:Real nice that the entire interstate from Gretna to the Lincoln airport is a "construction zone"...


Oooh I should drive it it'll make me feel like I'm back home in Chicago. I only wish I was exaggerating.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8936
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Mon May 23, 2011 2:52 pm

Looks like an almost 10 mile stretch is being graded just past the Ashland exit.  By then end of summer the may be only 20 miles left to do.

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Wed May 25, 2011 12:30 am

[font=Georgia]Finish line on six-lane I-80 work now in sight[/font]

ART HOVEY / Lincoln Journal Star wrote:The latest funding outlook signals a 2013 end to a long odyssey of lane-switching and traffic crossovers and the start of a smooth stretch of driving. The three remaining sections between Lincoln and the Platte River should be completed by then, at a projected cost of $130 million.

"It will be great when it's done," Goodbarn said of the 44-mile connection between the state's two largest cities, "but then again, it's not. The longer plan is to go west, so there's additional projects from Northwest 48th Street (in Lincoln) and beyond."

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:03 pm

[font=Georgia]I-80 project: Full speed ahead[/font]

Robynn Tysver WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER wrote:Federal dollars for the final stretch of the road work have been committed, and state officials expect the last load of concrete to be poured in 2013, said Mary Jo Oie, spokeswoman for the Nebraska Department of Roads. On any given day, about 45,000 vehicles travel on Interstate 80 between Omaha and Lincoln, according to road engineers.

Nearly 8,000 people in Douglas County reported in 2009 that they worked in Lancaster County, according to Jerry Deichert, a demographer with the University of Nebraska at Omaha's Center for Public Affairs Research. A little more than 9,000 people in Lancaster County said they worked in Douglas County, said Deichert, who used numbers provided by the U.S. Census Bureau.

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:17 pm

From the above article:

It will all come down to money and traffic counts, Oie said.


That about sums up the level of transportation "planning" that we've seen in Nebraska since the 50s. Sigh.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20814
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Mon Dec 12, 2011 10:53 pm

I drove through Lincoln today for the first time in a while and noticed all the bridges. Most all of them are mo longer steel but concrete/stone structure. But I had to wonder how many of these are new or fairly new. It was so different with the three lane extension I almost didn't know where I was.
Image

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3472
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:29 pm

Innovative interchange planned for west Lincoln.

http://journalstar.com/news/local/artic ... 60914.html

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3472
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:36 pm

This will affect road construction projects beyond interstates, but I thought it best to post here as the article talks about major road projects, and how an innovative plan is speeding up construction.

http://journalstar.com/news/local/artic ... 19d25.html

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8936
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:30 pm

http://www.omaha.com/article/20121102/NEWS/711039933/1685#a-6-lane-i-80-from-omaha-to-outskirts-of-lincoln-is-a-step-closer

Early next week, state roads workers will begin removing construction barriers to open the segment of Interstate 80 between Greenwood and Waverly, Neb., on Lincoln's northeast edge.


That leaves only a 5-mile portion of I-80 from the Waverly interchange to North 56th Street in Lincoln to be widened to six lanes. Knutson said that work should be completed in another year.

Linkin5
County Board
Posts: 3826
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 7:59 pm

Postby Linkin5 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:49 pm

Can't wait for it to be 75 all the way from Omaha to Lincoln!

User avatar
jessep28
Planning Board
Posts: 2381
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:10 pm
Location: Omaha Metro Area

Postby jessep28 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:37 pm

Linkin5 wrote:Can't wait for it to be 75 all the way from Omaha to Lincoln!


Next week they will probably announce the start of a 20 year project to make I-80 from Omaha to Lincoln 8 lanes to meet projected demand.
Verbum Domini Manet in Aeternum

User avatar
Brad
City Council
Posts: 28557
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:03 pm
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby Brad » Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:53 pm

Linkin5 wrote:Can't wait for it to be 75 all the way from Omaha to Lincoln!


Went to Lincoln on Saturday.  It will be so nice when its done!
Image
Omaha Skyline Photos, Omaha Aerial Photos, and More.
http://www.bradwilliamsphotography.com
http://www.facebook.com/bradwilliamsphotography
@bradwphoto on Twitter
Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce Member

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8936
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:25 pm

http://www.omaha.com/article/20130318/NEWS/703189949/1707

A $440 million project to widen and upgrade I-80 between Omaha and Lincoln is expected to wrap up by early November, the Nebraska Department of Roads said.

The improvements will put the speed limit at 75 mph on the entire I-80 stretch between Omaha and Lincoln.

The last phase of the long project — it began in 2001 — was to begin late Sunday night, weather permitting, in the Lincoln area, said Bob Sanburn, Roads Department project manager.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8936
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Wed Apr 10, 2013 5:34 pm

Really smooth sailing between Omaha and Lincoln.  Sort of can't believe how little traffic it felt like there was from the extra lane.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8936
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Wed Oct 30, 2013 6:42 pm

Looks like the last segment should open any day now.  Driving by it looks to be done with the lanes painted.  They were just rolling out the hay in the medians today.


Return to “Transportation”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest