2015 Census Estimates

Omaha area Housing and Market statistics

Moderators: Brad, nebugeater, Coyote, Omaha Cowboy

MTO
City Council
Posts: 7795
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:49 am
Location: Dundee

Re: 2015 Census Estimates

Postby MTO » Mon Jan 23, 2017 4:08 pm

Omababe wrote:
Garrett wrote:
MTO wrote:http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/top-10-housing-markets-constrained-by-tight-inventory


One acquaintance of mine who is a realtor has been saying it's a seller's market for some time now. It seems like, at least in the southwest 'burbs, "For Sale" signs don't last very long and I'm aware of two homes that have recently sold without a sign at all.

Kinda surprised to see Detroit on that list. I would have expected that to be more of a buyer's market.


Well thats good news then, even though I'm pro dencity in general a healthy population growth will keep our economy strong. I'm getting the impression that south west corner of the metro is hot hot hot right now. I wish if we have to have suburbs they had the density requirements like the left coast.
15-17, 26, 32

buildomaha
Home Owners Association
Posts: 98
Joined: Tue May 31, 2016 7:06 pm

Re: 2015 Census Estimates

Postby buildomaha » Mon Jan 23, 2017 6:05 pm

This seems like a better problem to have than not having anyone able to afford buying a house or am I mistaken?

buildomaha
Home Owners Association
Posts: 98
Joined: Tue May 31, 2016 7:06 pm

Re: 2015 Census Estimates

Postby buildomaha » Mon Jan 23, 2017 6:19 pm

MTO wrote:
Omababe wrote:
Garrett wrote:
MTO wrote:http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/top-10-housing-markets-constrained-by-tight-inventory


One acquaintance of mine who is a realtor has been saying it's a seller's market for some time now. It seems like, at least in the southwest 'burbs, "For Sale" signs don't last very long and I'm aware of two homes that have recently sold without a sign at all.

Kinda surprised to see Detroit on that list. I would have expected that to be more of a buyer's market.


Well thats good news then, even though I'm pro dencity in general a healthy population growth will keep our economy strong. I'm getting the impression that south west corner of the metro is hot hot hot right now. I wish if we have to have suburbs they had the density requirements like the left coast.

I assume you mean the east coast because LA is THE definition of urban sprawl... BUT, I don't think In Omaha, NE having density regulations would ever work. People come here because of our job availability and cheap, big houses and a yard. Until Omaha has more than that to offer, there isn't the demand to sustain those types of regulations. And Omaha won't have anything else special to build the demand if we continue building boring suburb after suburb.

MTO
City Council
Posts: 7795
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:49 am
Location: Dundee

Re: 2015 Census Estimates

Postby MTO » Tue Jan 24, 2017 10:56 am

buildomaha wrote:
MTO wrote:
Omababe wrote:
Garrett wrote:
MTO wrote:http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/top-10-housing-markets-constrained-by-tight-inventory


One acquaintance of mine who is a realtor has been saying it's a seller's market for some time now. It seems like, at least in the southwest 'burbs, "For Sale" signs don't last very long and I'm aware of two homes that have recently sold without a sign at all.

Kinda surprised to see Detroit on that list. I would have expected that to be more of a buyer's market.


Well thats good news then, even though I'm pro dencity in general a healthy population growth will keep our economy strong. I'm getting the impression that south west corner of the metro is hot hot hot right now. I wish if we have to have suburbs they had the density requirements like the left coast.

I assume you mean the east coast because LA is THE definition of urban sprawl... BUT, I don't think In Omaha, NE having density regulations would ever work. People come here because of our job availability and cheap, big houses and a yard. Until Omaha has more than that to offer, there isn't the demand to sustain those types of regulations. And Omaha won't have anything else special to build the demand if we continue building boring suburb after suburb.


I was talking west coast because I was talking about suburbs. If you look at your average California suburb from satellite you can see they are quite small lots with large houses.
15-17, 26, 32

User avatar
GetUrban
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1789
Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 3:07 pm
Location: Omaha

Re: 2015 Census Estimates

Postby GetUrban » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:44 pm

MTO wrote:
buildomaha wrote:
MTO wrote:
Omababe wrote:
Garrett wrote:
MTO wrote:http://www.realtor.com/news/trends/top-10-housing-markets-constrained-by-tight-inventory


One acquaintance of mine who is a realtor has been saying it's a seller's market for some time now. It seems like, at least in the southwest 'burbs, "For Sale" signs don't last very long and I'm aware of two homes that have recently sold without a sign at all.

Kinda surprised to see Detroit on that list. I would have expected that to be more of a buyer's market.


Well thats good news then, even though I'm pro dencity in general a healthy population growth will keep our economy strong. I'm getting the impression that south west corner of the metro is hot hot hot right now. I wish if we have to have suburbs they had the density requirements like the left coast.

I assume you mean the east coast because LA is THE definition of urban sprawl... BUT, I don't think In Omaha, NE having density regulations would ever work. People come here because of our job availability and cheap, big houses and a yard. Until Omaha has more than that to offer, there isn't the demand to sustain those types of regulations. And Omaha won't have anything else special to build the demand if we continue building boring suburb after suburb.


I was talking west coast because I was talking about suburbs. If you look at your average California suburb from satellite you can see they are quite small lots with large houses.


The first step for Omaha would be to relax zoning regulations to allow higher density in suburban areas. The current regs generally restrict higher density and mixed use development to some extent in suburban areas. I don't think you can ever "require" higher density, just allow it to happen naturally if the demand exists. People who prefer to live in low-density areas will always fight higher density coming in to their neighborhood, even though their property values could actually increase if there is a higher demand for their property to be redeveloped into something denser.
He said "They are some big, ugly red brick buildings"
...and then they were gone.


Return to “Statistics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest