Official: UNL Campus Development

Capital city news and discussion.

Moderators: Coyote, Omaha Cowboy, Brad, nebugeater

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Official: UNL Campus Development

Postby iamjacobm » Wed Jun 15, 2011 6:46 pm

I didn't find an official thread for UNL developments like the ones for Creighton and UNO so here we go.

http://journalstar.com/news/local/education/article_c1ee5523-fe72-5553-9798-aaded3763e81.html

If approved, two new dorms will go up on the north side of R Street, east of the Robert E. Knoll Residential Center, according to a  program statement and budget prepared by UNL Facilities Planning. The 373,000-square-foot complex will house 1,025 students in suite-style housing.
The estimated project cost is $79 million.

The proposed start of construction for Phase I, which will be six stories and provide more than 500 beds, is January 2012, with completion expected in June 2013. Phase II -- five stories and more than 525 beds -- will be completed a year later.
Construction of the two new halls will permit the proposed demolition of Cather and Pound halls in May 2014. Cather and Pound, built in 1963, are the least popular residence halls on campus, according to the program statement.


It will be bitter sweet to see Cather-Pound go.  Those rooms are so terrible, but I had a lot of fun my freshman year living there.  It would be nice to see the names transfered over to these new buildings.

Linkin5
County Board
Posts: 3820
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 7:59 pm

Postby Linkin5 » Thu Jun 16, 2011 10:11 am

That will definitely be sad to see those dorms go.  I kind of like how they bordered and towered over the street.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:23 pm

Heres a rendering of the new dorms.

Image

User avatar
Seth
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1439
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2010 4:59 pm
Location: Ford Birthsite Neighborhood

Postby Seth » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:57 pm

Are these replacing all of the beds in the old towers?

BTW, pretty soon kids won't even have good old-fashioned dorm experiences.  Spoiled little brats in their "suite-style" residences.  Back in my day, we had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways...

bigredmed
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1905
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 12:45 pm
Location: Omaha Metro Area

Postby bigredmed » Thu Jan 12, 2012 9:38 am

Seth wrote:Are these replacing all of the beds in the old towers?

BTW, pretty soon kids won't even have good old-fashioned dorm experiences.  Spoiled little brats in their "suite-style" residences.  Back in my day, we had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways...


At least you got to walk.   We had to crawl, with bags of coal on our backs.....

I think these dorms are getting quite a bit too fancy.   The cost of these low-density housing options translate into greater student loan debt and that limits people's future.  Better to suck it up when you are 18, so you can live better when you are 28.

Linkin5
County Board
Posts: 3820
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 7:59 pm

Postby Linkin5 » Thu Jan 12, 2012 11:26 am

I think we may just be jealous.  I remember my freshman dorm room, NO air conditioning and had to sleep on the top bunk.  Hated it.

User avatar
Seth
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1439
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2010 4:59 pm
Location: Ford Birthsite Neighborhood

Postby Seth » Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:53 am

These new high-end on-campus residences are one contributing factor to increasing costs of university attendance.  If I ever pay college tuition for my kids, they'll have to chip in their own money for digs like that!

User avatar
FrontlineOmaha
Home Owners Association
Posts: 88
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2011 10:47 am
Location: Omaha, NE
Contact:

Postby FrontlineOmaha » Mon Jan 16, 2012 3:06 pm

while contributing to higher costs, they also result in an increased draw for students, so its kind of a catch 22.

joeglow
Planning Board
Posts: 2729
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 7:04 pm

Postby joeglow » Tue Jan 17, 2012 7:23 am

Seth wrote:These new high-end on-campus residences are one contributing factor to increasing costs of university attendance.  If I ever pay college tuition for my kids, they'll have to chip in their own money for digs like that!


ding ding ding ding.  There was a great article in Money magazine 4 or 5 months ago about how this accounts for the majority of the sky-rocketing costs.  It showed that if you reduce this (and the out of control need to spend so much money on new technology), college would suddenly be affordable again.

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:20 am

This is probably as good a time as any to point out how useless most 4-year undergraduate degrees are.

Unless you're A) going to an Ivy League-esque school, or B) know exactly what you are planning to do and can specialize in it at a quality school without a bunch of useless general studies, don't waste your time and money.

The 2 1/2 years I was enrolled at Lincoln was the biggest waste of time in my life, with the possible exception of high school.

More free advice: if you're in high school and bored, take the time to learn Spanish.  I really regret not taking advantage of that.
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

User avatar
S33
County Board
Posts: 4552
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 12:15 pm

Postby S33 » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:19 pm

Sad, but true. After spending tens of thousands of dollars on a 4 year degree, most walk away with nothing much more than a signed piece of paper to wave in front of endless HR departments. The amount of information students retain is pathetic because of they schooling gauntlet they are tossed into.

However, you can't deny the fact that having a 4-year degree is crucial for those who lack trade skills, basic business acumen, or a family with money.

Some of the smartest people I know decided to forego college and jump right into career fields that interest them. Those 4 years of experience are far more valuable than a bunch of useless probability and submodule or political science classes.

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:27 pm

S33 wrote:However, you can't deny the fact that having a 4-year degree is crucial for those who lack trade skills, basic business acumen, or a family with money.


I'd value a couple semesters of night school and online classes in a specific concentration at Metro while getting some OTJ training before I'd bother with a general four-year degree.

Then if you want to get a master's or advanced degree of some sort go for it.  You can probably test out of 95% of any pre-requisites.

Obviously there are professions where this plan doesn't hold up (and schools that are worth going to out of the gate), but I think those would be pretty obvious.

Addendum:  Also, obviously there are PARTS of a general 4-yr degree that are worthwhile to your profession.  There's just way too much fluff in between.
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

joeglow
Planning Board
Posts: 2729
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 7:04 pm

Postby joeglow » Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:59 am

Big E wrote:
S33 wrote:However, you can't deny the fact that having a 4-year degree is crucial for those who lack trade skills, basic business acumen, or a family with money.


I'd value a couple semesters of night school and online classes in a specific concentration at Metro while getting some OTJ training before I'd bother with a general four-year degree.

Then if you want to get a master's or advanced degree of some sort go for it.  You can probably test out of 95% of any pre-requisites.

Obviously there are professions where this plan doesn't hold up (and schools that are worth going to out of the gate), but I think those would be pretty obvious.

Addendum:  Also, obviously there are PARTS of a general 4-yr degree that are worthwhile to your profession.  There's just way too much fluff in between.


THAT is the problem.  75% of the degrees are worthless.  One of the things I laugh about with the Occupy Wall Street crowd is the people who got a 4 year degree in English, Art, Spanish, History, Classics, Women's Studies, etc. and complain they cannot find a job.  If you are going to get a 4 year degree, get one that is valuable (Accounting, Engineering, Medicine, Finance, Actuarial Science, etc.).  Otherwise, you are pissing money away.

User avatar
Garrett
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1774
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:29 pm
Location: Chicago

Postby Garrett » Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:29 pm

From Omaha to Chicago
From Axel to Garrett

Still the same guy

User avatar
Garrett
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1774
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:29 pm
Location: Chicago

Postby Garrett » Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:32 pm

joeglow wrote:
Big E wrote:
S33 wrote:However, you can't deny the fact that having a 4-year degree is crucial for those who lack trade skills, basic business acumen, or a family with money.


I'd value a couple semesters of night school and online classes in a specific concentration at Metro while getting some OTJ training before I'd bother with a general four-year degree.

Then if you want to get a master's or advanced degree of some sort go for it.  You can probably test out of 95% of any pre-requisites.

Obviously there are professions where this plan doesn't hold up (and schools that are worth going to out of the gate), but I think those would be pretty obvious.

Addendum:  Also, obviously there are PARTS of a general 4-yr degree that are worthwhile to your profession.  There's just way too much fluff in between.


THAT is the problem.  75% of the degrees are worthless.  One of the things I laugh about with the Occupy Wall Street crowd is the people who got a 4 year degree in English, Art, Spanish, History, Classics, Women's Studies, etc. and complain they cannot find a job.  If you are going to get a 4 year degree, get one that is valuable (Accounting, Engineering, Medicine, Finance, Actuarial Science, etc.).  Otherwise, you are pissing money away.


Majoring in Spanish actually should land you plenty of jobs... if combined with another major its even better.
From Omaha to Chicago
From Axel to Garrett

Still the same guy

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:51 pm

I'd actually make the argument that any one of those hippie majors can land you a great job (or at least a great paycheck) IF you get it from the right school.

Ultimately, it depends nearly as much on the person getting the degree as the degree itself.
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

joeglow
Planning Board
Posts: 2729
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 7:04 pm

Postby joeglow » Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:54 pm

Axel wrote:
joeglow wrote:
Big E wrote:[quote="S33"]However, you can't deny the fact that having a 4-year degree is crucial for those who lack trade skills, basic business acumen, or a family with money.


I'd value a couple semesters of night school and online classes in a specific concentration at Metro while getting some OTJ training before I'd bother with a general four-year degree.

Then if you want to get a master's or advanced degree of some sort go for it.  You can probably test out of 95% of any pre-requisites.

Obviously there are professions where this plan doesn't hold up (and schools that are worth going to out of the gate), but I think those would be pretty obvious.

Addendum:  Also, obviously there are PARTS of a general 4-yr degree that are worthwhile to your profession.  There's just way too much fluff in between.


THAT is the problem.  75% of the degrees are worthless.  One of the things I laugh about with the Occupy Wall Street crowd is the people who got a 4 year degree in English, Art, Spanish, History, Classics, Women's Studies, etc. and complain they cannot find a job.  If you are going to get a 4 year degree, get one that is valuable (Accounting, Engineering, Medicine, Finance, Actuarial Science, etc.).  Otherwise, you are pissing money away.


Majoring in Spanish actually should land you plenty of jobs... if combined with another major its even better.[/quote]

I had a friend with 2 majors, 1 being Spanish.  He could get a lot of jobs, but most of them were sh*t jobs.  He went back and got an MBA and got much better jobs.  

To your point, Spanish is a great secondary skill.  If you want it to be a primary skill, you may as well just take a lot of Spanish classes at Metro.

User avatar
TitosBuritoBarn
Planning Board
Posts: 2054
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 7:08 pm
Location: St. Louis

Postby TitosBuritoBarn » Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:46 pm

I would have been content just having an up-to-date dorm. The dorms I lived in at Iowa State certainly had character, but I felt like I was living in a housing project. It didn't seem like they had done any renovations since the '60s on a building that was built in the '20s.

User avatar
Seth
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1439
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2010 4:59 pm
Location: Ford Birthsite Neighborhood

Postby Seth » Sat Jan 28, 2012 2:42 am

TitosBuritoBarn wrote:I would have been content just having an up-to-date dorm. The dorms I lived in at Iowa State certainly had character, but I felt like I was living in a housing project. It didn't seem like they had done any renovations since the '60s on a building that was built in the '20s.

At Illinois where I went, most of the university housing is classic dorms, and they've been replacing the old and run-down ones with newer, slightly fancier ones, but still dorm-style living.

The rich kids who want to be babied can live in what they call "private certified" housing.  There are six or eight privately owned-and-operated buildings that have suite-style rooms (pretty much small apartments), laundry service, etc along with their own cafeteria and the normal dorm amenities.  They have agreements with the university to conform to the underclass rules, so freshmen can can live there (if I remember correctly they only require you to live in dorms or private-certified your first year; after that you can get your own apartment if you choose).  I think that approach makes the most sense, because it doesn't affect prices for average students who are there to get an education, not lounge around playing video games in their luxury loft apartment that everyone else is helping pay for.

Louie
Library Board
Posts: 403
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:23 pm
Location: Maplewood

Postby Louie » Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:27 pm

Well put. That is also the agreement at UNL. We have to live on campus for our freshman year unless our legal guardian's residence is within 15 miles.

bigredmed
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1905
Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 12:45 pm
Location: Omaha Metro Area

Postby bigredmed » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:01 pm

Ultra fancy dorms are part of the false economy created by the colleges when the limits on GSL's were lifted.   Students look at fancy, and they look at old.  They don't see indulgant vs utilitarian, because they don't have a meaningful limit on their budgets.   Bring back those, and you get some market disincentive to live fancy.   Of course, you also get market disincentive to womens studies, french poetry, and the other majors that don't make money.

Students today miss out on something my generation got.   Depression, ww2, and 50's stories.   Living was hard for everyone till the 50's, but then you had to work your way through college.   No one lent money to fools taking fluff degrees because they couldn't pay it back.   Fools who did borrow for such things suffered and became cautionary tales for the next generation of dutch uncles.   We got told to get profitable degrees.   We got taught that in any business, if your job didn't touch the profit stream, you needed a new one.   We were fortunate.   Today's kids aren't.

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20616
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:15 pm

Highest-paying college majors
Students looking for a fiscally prosperous post-college life can find one by pursuing a degree in the maths or sciences. It may not be surprising the engineering and computer science fields land on the list of highest-paid bachelor's degrees. But PayScale.com's "Best Undergrad College Degrees By Salary" report reveals other majors can lead to lucrative careers as well. Following are 10 of the top undergraduate degree fields -- and what you need to do to break into them.

Engineering
Median mid-career pay: $88,600-$155,000
Median starting salary: $51,700-$97,900

When it comes to landing an impressive paycheck, engineers dominate. Seven of the top highest-paying college majors are in the engineering fields with petroleum, chemical, electrical, materials science and aerospace engineering claiming the top five slots. Engineers across all disciplines can up their pay by getting a Professional Engineering, or PE, license, says Lawrence Jacobson, executive director of the National Society of Professional Engineers in Alexandria, Va. "Only 10 percent of practicing engineers are licensed, and that's because most manufacturing companies don't require licenses," Jacobson says. "The average delta between the licensed and unlicensed person is about $10,000 per year. Over a 30-year career, that's a lot of money." Jacobson adds that obtaining a license provides job seekers with more career options, the ability to go into business for themselves and the right to provide expert testimony in court cases. The catch is that getting a PE license is difficult. Jacobson recommends that new engineering grads take the exam as soon as possible, which is usually after completing four to five years of work in the field after graduation.


Computer science
Median mid-career pay: $97,900
Median starting salary: $56,600

Sky-high grades and work experience play significant roles in landing top computer jobs, but independent projects are valued too, says Gayle Laakmann McDowell, author of "The Google Resume: How to Prepare for a Career and Land a Job at Apple, Microsoft, Google, or any Top Tech Company." "If you build a really interesting Google Maps competitor and a ton of people download it and it's really well-known, that's going to count more than an internship at a company that nobody knows," she says. Attending a big-name institution can help get your foot in the door, but it's not crucial to landing an impressive post-college job. "There are tons of people who come from completely lesser-known schools and get jobs at Microsoft," McDowell says. "A candidate who has a 3.5 (grade point average) from MIT, but has no work and project experience, isn't that interesting." To turn recruiters' heads, McDowell recommends doing internships, taking classes that assign tough projects and spending your free time coding as much as you can.

Physics
Median mid-career pay: $101,000
Median starting salary: $49,800

Master the mathematical foundation of the world around us, and you can land a job practically anywhere. The American Institute of Physics reports that those with a physics degree find work in organizations ranging from high schools and hospitals to the U.S. military, museums, publishing firms, domestic and foreign governments and laboratories. You'll also have to think about continuing your education. Research from Georgetown University shows that 67 percent of physics majors go on to obtain a higher degree. Regardless of what career path you choose, Katharine Brooks, author of "You Majored in What? Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career," says students need to think beyond their bachelor's degrees. "Start acquiring experience early on in your academic career. Don't wait until your senior year to look for an internship," she says. To get a jump on the job hunt, Brooks recommends students create a LinkedIn account, make contacts and reach out to professional associations in their field as soon as possible.


Applied mathematics and general mathematics
Median mid-career pay: $89,900-$98,600
Median starting salary: $47,000-$52,600

Applied mathematics, statistics and mathematics majors are known for bringing home the fiscal bacon, but a double bonus to taking one of these degrees is the booming job market in these related fields. Jeff Strohl, director of research for Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce, reports that jobs abound. A whopping 95 percent of mathematics majors and 92 percent of those majoring in statistics or mathematical decision science fields are employed. If you want to sweeten your paycheck, aim high on the career ladder. "As people age, moving into management generally leads into higher earnings, regardless of what the major is," he says.


Economics
Median mid-career pay: $94,700
Median starting salary: $47,300

"Economics majors tend to pursue business and finance-related fields," says Brooks. "Banking and finance are in the top of the salary strata." While econ majors do land lucrative gigs with banks and other financial institutions, the degree is also frequently used to establish careers in law, consulting, education, research, government, nonprofit and public policy work, reports the American Economic Association. Brooks adds that how much you make corresponds more to your career field than your major. For example, an economics major who goes into nonprofit work may earn less than a liberal arts major who enters the financial sector. When choosing a major, Brooks encourages students to think about their desired career field and how well skills developed in a given major might parlay into different occupations.


Management information systems
Median mid-career pay: $88,200
Median starting salary: $51,000

"Data matter," says Nathan Lippe, product director of the job-hunting website CareerRookie.com. "If (a company) doesn't have a good team of people looking at their data to understand what things might be able to change that business, they might lose their competitive edge." Management information systems majors to the rescue. Trained to analyze organizations' computer databases, oversee projects and improve company productivity and efficiency, MIS grads enjoy a practically booming job market with the field growing 17 percent each year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. When seeking top MIS jobs, Lippe advises students to use campus resources. "A lot of times (campus) career centers and even professors are going to have relationships with companies that hire a higher volume of those types of students," he says.


Finance
Median mid-career pay: $87,300
Median starting salary: $46,500

Not surprisingly, finance is one of the highest-paying college majors. Lippe says college students majoring in finance and who have played a finance role in on-campus organizations will have a leg up over the competition. "(Students) need to talk numbers. They need to explain, 'I had X dollars in my budget that I was responsible for, this is what we did with those dollars and this is the impact on that organization,'" Lippe says. "Telling that financial story will make you stand out from someone saying, 'Hey, I was a member of the finance club, and I was in it for four years.'" If your school doesn't require a finance internship, hiring managers will, says Lippe. Interning once is great, but those competing for top positions in the field will graduate with two or three internships under their belts.


Government and political science
Median mid-career pay: $80,100-$87,300
Median starting salary: $39,900-$41,400

All levels of U.S. government seek out these majors, but so do domestic and international companies, contracting firms, nonprofits, think tanks, lobbying groups, political campaigns, aid organizations and nongovernmental entities, according to Augustana College in Sioux Falls, S.D. As with economics, degrees in government and political science are very flexible, with grads finding work in public policy, business, finance, marketing, education and legal sectors. While the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that, across all disciplines, hiring on the state and local levels is slower than on the federal level, those who enter in management, business and financial roles will have the greatest likelihood to land jobs.


Construction management, supply chain management
Median mid-career pay: $84,700-$85,200
Median starting salary: $50,200

Planning, organizing, supervising, analyzing logistics and overseeing the flow of work -- whether it's building a hospital or managing a warehouse -- are the key skills necessary for these college majors. Master these, and you'll be rewarded with a high-paying job with benefits. The catch is finding that job could be challenging. While the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the construction management field is expected to expand by 17 percent this year, supply chain majors who become managers, buyers and purchasing agents will only see a 7 percent employment increase in their sector. To break into your industry as quickly as possible, Brooks recommends students make use of their school's alumni network. "That can be a really great way to connect with graduates who majored in the same thing you did," she says.

Biochemistry
Median mid-career pay: $84,700
Median starting salary: $41,700

"Biochemistry is a great major because you can get a job at just about any location in any place in the U.S.," says Nathan Lippe. "You might be in quality assurance at a manufacturing plant for food, at a farming organization looking at modifying seeds, in the oil and gas industry looking at alternatives for fuel. All of those things would be available for a biochemist." Flexible and lucrative, biochemistry majors find work in hospitals, labs, research facilities, agriculture organizations, biotech firms, pharmaceutical companies, energy and fuel organizations, clinics, refineries and manufacturers. "The number of jobs versus candidates is very tight (in this field)," Lippe says, adding that for every open biochemistry position, there are 1.3 applicants trying to get it. To stand out, biochem majors should have substantial lab and research experience on their resumes as well as an internship or two.
Image

User avatar
Coyote
City Council
Posts: 20616
Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2003 11:18 am
Location: Three floors down
Contact:

Postby Coyote » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:18 pm

Image

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Wed Feb 01, 2012 10:09 am

(Prob time to spin this thread off.)

Editorial from Nelson in the OWH.  Not a whole lot of depth here (never are in his articles), but the idea is a good one:

http://www.omaha.com/article/20120201/N ... chnical-ed

I'm guessing this might be why I was thrilled to see State Sen. Brad Ashford of Omaha's bill, LB 1144, that would allow school districts to create "career academies," the 21st-century name for (mostly) high schools that have a strong focus on training students for particular trades. Ashford's bill would allow the creation of such schools for seventh through 12th grades.

........

Union Pacific Railroad officials confirmed that they fill some 300 jobs a year that demand expertise in a particular field, but not a bachelor's degree. The average salary of those jobs is $82,000 a year.

Union Pacific execs argue, as does Ashford, that Nebraska needs schools where students inclined toward the trades can get the intensive, sophisticated training they need.
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."

User avatar
S33
County Board
Posts: 4552
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 12:15 pm

Postby S33 » Wed Feb 01, 2012 10:18 am

Who would have thunk it, high schools offering training for skilled jobs to the massive numbers of students who have no interest, or money for that matter, to attend college. My only concern is having such a focused education that they are married to any one industry, industries which have proven to come and go here in the US.

User avatar
Stargazer
County Board
Posts: 3927
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:06 am
Location: west Omaha

Postby Stargazer » Wed Feb 01, 2012 11:26 am

Millard South has a pretty decent Cisco network admin career path from what I can tell... more programs like that needed.

User avatar
Garrett
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1774
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:29 pm
Location: Chicago

Postby Garrett » Thu Feb 09, 2012 12:06 am

Millard has 6 career academies, Culinary, Health, Entrepreneurship, Business, Education and Distribution and Logistics management.
From Omaha to Chicago
From Axel to Garrett

Still the same guy

Omahanerd
New to the Neighborhood
Posts: 39
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:55 am
Location: Chicago via Omaha

Postby Omahanerd » Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:07 pm

Does anyone know whats planned for the lot where the old Lambda Chi house was located?

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Jun 22, 2012 9:07 am

UNL is looking to build more than a simple parking garage for their next project.

http://journalstar.com/business/local/unl-wants-parking-garage-to-have-residential-commercial-elements/article_bad9d54b-2902-5ccb-bc40-bc902f5a6b96.html

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln wants to pump up a proposed parking garage at 18th and R streets.
UNL said Friday it is seeking proposals for a mixed-use development to include residential and possible retail or commercial use to create development complementary to the campus.


Jackson said this proposal would be unique on campus, with dedicated university parking, private residences and commercial space. Maximum height of the building would be 130 feet; the university requires 1,250 parking spaces for student, faculty and staff use.

User avatar
TitosBuritoBarn
Planning Board
Posts: 2054
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 7:08 pm
Location: St. Louis

Postby TitosBuritoBarn » Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:32 pm

iamjacobm wrote:
Jackson said this proposal would be unique on campus, with dedicated university parking, private residences and commercial space. Maximum height of the building would be 130 feet; the university requires 1,250 parking spaces for student, faculty and staff use.


Key words being "on campus" I guess. This sounds almost exactly like the Parkhaus they're building several blocks away.

MadMartin8
Planning Board
Posts: 2136
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:48 pm
Location: Beyond Thunderdome

Postby MadMartin8 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 7:13 pm

TitosBuritoBarn wrote:
iamjacobm wrote:
Jackson said this proposal would be unique on campus, with dedicated university parking, private residences and commercial space. Maximum height of the building would be 130 feet; the university requires 1,250 parking spaces for student, faculty and staff use.


Key words being "on campus" I guess. This sounds almost exactly like the Parkhaus they're building several blocks away.


Pretty much exactly. Maybe it's the start of a new architectural trend, the Lincoln style square parking garage/apartment/shopping centers.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Jun 22, 2012 7:20 pm

MadMartin8 wrote:
TitosBuritoBarn wrote:
iamjacobm wrote:
[quote]Jackson said this proposal would be unique on campus, with dedicated university parking, private residences and commercial space. Maximum height of the building would be 130 feet; the university requires 1,250 parking spaces for student, faculty and staff use.


Key words being "on campus" I guess. This sounds almost exactly like the Parkhaus they're building several blocks away.


Pretty much exactly. Maybe it's the start of a new architectural trend, the Lincoln style square parking garage/apartment/shopping centers.[/quote]

Give me what Lincoln's parking garages are becoming over the massive dead blocks of parking garage in Omaha.  At least the cars are parked above and below quality urban enhancements.

Linkin5
County Board
Posts: 3820
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 7:59 pm

Postby Linkin5 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:20 pm

I'll take them over just a plain parking garage but I do also agree they look kind of odd.  If there was more than about 4 stories of residential they wouldn't look as strange.

With that said, I still can't believe the growth of downtown Lincoln.  I wish it would have happened when I lived there.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Sep 14, 2012 2:41 pm

http://www.omaha.com/article/20120914/NEWS/120919813/1685#nu-board-of-regents-approves-plan-for-84-million-building

The University of Nebraska Board of Regents unanimously approved plans Friday to build a new $84 million building for the College of Business Administration at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

CapitalGuy
Human Relations
Posts: 522
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Lincoln, NE

Postby CapitalGuy » Sun Sep 16, 2012 2:51 pm

Image

CapitalGuy
Human Relations
Posts: 522
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Lincoln, NE

Postby CapitalGuy » Sun Sep 16, 2012 2:53 pm

Image

CapitalGuy
Human Relations
Posts: 522
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Lincoln, NE

Postby CapitalGuy » Sun Sep 16, 2012 2:57 pm

Newman Center plans new church

In April 2013, the Newman Center’s building will be torn down to make room for a Newman Center twice its original size. The $17 million church will be open and ready for use by late 2014.


Current Newman Center
26,000 square feet
Two stories
Sanctuary capacity: 300

New Newman center
55,000-65,000 square feet
Three stories plus a basement
Sanctuary capacity: 650
$10.1 million of $25 million currently raised.
[/url]

almighty_tuna
County Board
Posts: 4458
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2004 1:34 pm
Location: Somewhere between downtown and Colorado
Contact:

Postby almighty_tuna » Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:43 am

Image

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8855
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Mon Sep 17, 2012 6:51 am

Thanks for the renderings!  That is going to look great right there on Vine.

Big E
City Council
Posts: 7767
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 11:12 am

Postby Big E » Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:49 am

almighty_tuna wrote:Image


I hear the entire project was funded by frats returning beer bottles to Michigan.
"The above statement was not intended to be factual."


Return to “Lincoln”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest