Omaha vs Lincoln - LJS

Capital city news and discussion.

Moderators: Brad, nebugeater, Coyote, Omaha Cowboy

almighty_tuna
County Board
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2004 1:34 pm
Location: Now available in South Central Omaha!
Contact:

Omaha vs Lincoln - LJS

Postby almighty_tuna » Fri Jul 03, 2009 9:12 pm

Not here to debate the merits of Lincoln vs Omaha.  There are certainly pros and cons to each.  Just a thread about how disappointed I was that the Journal Star couldn't do any better than flame bait as an excuse for an article in the 402 section.  And in the end, the "article" wasn't even worthwhile...mostly anecdotal and lacking in any sort of real positive comparison.  More of a literary Jerry Springer show.  The comments, particularly those about a regional airport, just serve to reinforce the uninformed opinions about the area and show the LJS (and the OWH for that matter) that they can get away with junk reporting.

I can't say that I expected any better from the LJS (again, or that the OWH would be any better) but it's getting old.  Next time, try going for an article that can serve to discover the potential in the area.  *sigh*

LJS wrote:Last week, we stole an idea from the Star City Scene message board and asked readers, “Why is Lincoln better than Omaha, and why is Omaha better than Lincoln?”


http://journalstar.com/articles/2009/06 ... 505023.txt

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sat Jul 04, 2009 1:47 pm

This is very lame, amateur journalism at best, for the reasons you stated and more.

I think it's hilarious that the first thing they list for why Lincoln is better than Omaha is "a certain football team."

Not to mention almost all the "pros" listed for Lincoln, Omaha has... and in greater quantity/quality! Bike trails, coffee shops, children's museum, bars/nightlife, etc.

I don't think I need to say anything further on this, but I think it's telling that, given the opportunity to actually say why the readers of the LJS think that Lincoln is better than Omaha, all they were able to come up with was UNL football, a bunch of generic things that Omaha has in greater quantity or quality, and a few specific notable restaurants/bars.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sat Jul 04, 2009 2:05 pm

After going back and reading a good three quarters of the comments on the LJS web site, I'm happy to say that it seems that the vast majority out there realize that it is no contest. All the things that Lincoln has that make it great, Omaha has and more.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

Edagger
New to the Neighborhood
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 7:48 pm
Location: Omaha Metro Area

Postby Edagger » Sat Jul 04, 2009 3:50 pm

Oh boy!

As an individual that has lived in both towns recently, I feel as though I better contribute.  Both towns have plenty of goods and bads...

Although Lincoln seems to have more bike paths they are not designed nearly as well as the Omaha ones.  It also probably just seems like Lincoln has more since the town is much smaller.  

I really enjoy the fact that Lincoln is flat.  I walk or ride my bike almost everywhere with ease.  
Driving on the other hand is one of the most stressful things in Lincoln.  I could easily get twice the distance in half the time on Omaha roads.  

Omaha is way more progressive than Lincoln...way more!  The leaders in Lincoln still think its a small farming community/college town.  Height restrictions on downtown buildings because of our big phallic capital building? Lincoln is no Washington D.C.  Lincoln also will not widen roads that badly need it because they are in “historic” areas...they are roads!

I really hate when anyone in this town (Lincoln) mentions the Huskers.  A bunch of 18-22 year old kids that play in a huge outdated facility maybe 6 times a year.  I'm not putting down the sport or the team, but using that when describing good things about a town is absurd.

Downtown Lincoln is nice because the bulk of the entertainment venues are there.  Omaha also has this but they seem a little more spread out.  The Haymarket and the Old Market are both great for about the same reasons.  Lincoln has nothing to compare to Dundee or Benson.  Southeast Lincoln and West Omaha are similar.  They both have Walmart, Super Target and all the other corporate stuff that people on this site hate.

I like both towns, but probably enjoy Omaha a little more.
Cant we all just get along?

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sat Jul 04, 2009 5:36 pm

Edagger wrote:The leaders in Lincoln still think its a small farming community/college town.


BINGO! Unfortunately, that includes our state leadership and people who have a say in what happens in Omaha.

I totally agree with your analysis of Lincoln. And, to the list of great urban neighborhoods that Lincoln can't match (you mentioned Dundee and Benson), you can add South Omaha, Little Italy, the Gold Coast (Midtown proper), Park East, Park Ave./Hanscom/Field Club, etc.

Oh, and I love your categorization of UNL football!
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
TitosBuritoBarn
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1988
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 7:08 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Postby TitosBuritoBarn » Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:24 am

I hate reading city debates.

I honestly don't mind the Lincoln vs. Omaha debate here. As someone whose family are all from Lincoln but who has spend his entire life in Omaha, I have a connection to both cities and see pros and cons of both.

The reason I hate reading city debates are for the people who contribute and declare that both are....whatever offensive word they come up with....for extremely dumb reasons.

A common one is this "I hated Omahalincolnorwhatever because there were no mountains for me to go hiking and the fishing is terrible. Now I live in Seattle and everything is great." Hiking and fishing are not elements of city living. Moving to Manhattan will present the same dilemma. And by 'now I live in Seattle' or whatever city it happens to be, what they generally mean to say is 'now I live in an exurb 30 miles outside of Seattle that had 60% fewer people five years ago that allows me to do my fishing and hiking because, well, its not actually a city.'

Then there are those who comment on the fact that a city is too small. If the place has fewer than 500,000 people I will give them credit for that. Otherwise, these are people who think a cultural hotbed is a place with two Crate and Barrels. They wouldn't know culture if there was a button for 'cultural places' on the GPS device they use for driving around their own suburb. There are many cultural advantages to larger cities, but for what most people do in their daily lives and on weekends, I don't think those advantages are sweet enough to label smaller cities like Omaha as 'dumps' or 'boring'. If you're bored in Omaha you're either a chronic outdoors-man, or a very drab person to begin with.

Then there are those who don't even try to give an argument for why a certain place 'sucks.' It just apparently does and that whatever usually fast growing sunbelt city they live in is better. Again, not for any reason. Why? Why say these things? Exactly zero people are going to change their opinions on your statement. What you've really accomplished is establishing that there is at least one prick that lives in your city and that there are probably others.

Erik
Parks & Recreation
Posts: 1201
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 12:55 am

Postby Erik » Tue Jul 07, 2009 8:24 pm

TitosBuritoBarn wrote:I hate reading city debates.

I honestly don't mind the Lincoln vs. Omaha debate here. As someone whose family are all from Lincoln but who has spend his entire life in Omaha, I have a connection to both cities and see pros and cons of both.

The reason I hate reading city debates are for the people who contribute and declare that both are....whatever offensive word they come up with....for extremely dumb reasons.

A common one is this "I hated Omahalincolnorwhatever because there were no mountains for me to go hiking and the fishing is terrible. Now I live in Seattle and everything is great." Hiking and fishing are not elements of city living. Moving to Manhattan will present the same dilemma. And by 'now I live in Seattle' or whatever city it happens to be, what they generally mean to say is 'now I live in an exurb 30 miles outside of Seattle that had 60% fewer people five years ago that allows me to do my fishing and hiking because, well, its not actually a city.'

Then there are those who comment on the fact that a city is too small. If the place has fewer than 500,000 people I will give them credit for that. Otherwise, these are people who think a cultural hotbed is a place with two Crate and Barrels. They wouldn't know culture if there was a button for 'cultural places' on the GPS device they use for driving around their own suburb. There are many cultural advantages to larger cities, but for what most people do in their daily lives and on weekends, I don't think those advantages are sweet enough to label smaller cities like Omaha as 'dumps' or 'boring'. If you're bored in Omaha you're either a chronic outdoors-man, or a very drab person to begin with.

Then there are those who don't even try to give an argument for why a certain place 'sucks.' It just apparently does and that whatever usually fast growing sunbelt city they live in is better. Again, not for any reason. Why? Why say these things? Exactly zero people are going to change their opinions on your statement. What you've really accomplished is establishing that there is at least one prick that lives in your city and that there are probably others.


BINGO..

I agree completely..

DTO Luv
City Council
Posts: 9975
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 4:22 pm

Postby DTO Luv » Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:18 am

Well people in Omaha are better drivers. :lafcry:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOaRLI_QTUQ[/youtube]
Image

joeglow
Planning Board
Posts: 2729
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 7:04 pm

Postby joeglow » Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:42 pm

I do miss The Watering Hole's wings.

User avatar
Candleshoe
Human Relations
Posts: 776
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 12:30 pm
Location: Grand Island, NE

Postby Candleshoe » Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:45 pm

Well people in Omaha are better drivers. Crying Laughing



Check & mate...



phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=5823&highlight=drivers


:laser:

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:49 pm

They are both so similiar, but yet, different.  To me, Lincoln feels kind of like a mix of a "Omaha" and a "Ft. Collins, CO", and has a certain energy, that I don't feel Omaha quite has.  Omaha feels more like a mix of a "Lincoln" and a "Kansas City", or something, to me.  It all comes down to Lincoln has the "college town" thing goin' on.  Omaha has young and fresh qualities, too, with the downtown attractions and music scene, but to me, it also feels more...more...whatever that feeling is you get when you drive by Mutual of Omaha, or, the Woodmen or UP.  I feel it feels more established and branded as a center of "big business" on the map & on the nation's conscience, on the river...of family and corporate life and play...of a baseball game on the weekend, or taking the kids to the zoo.

Growing up in Omaha, I really didn't give Lincoln much of a chance, nor really explored it that much.  It sat a ways off the interstate, that is why.  I had been to the Capitol Building downtown and UNL, and that's mostly it.  However, upon exploring it more in recent years, I'm really impressed.  It really is a nice, tidy, progressive, energetic, small-to-mid-size American city with a healthy, neat downtown, a nice leafy inner city, and very nice, new suburban areas surrounding the core.  

I've always liked Omaha, but I almost equally like Lincoln.  In certain ways, I like Omaha better.  Yet, in certain ways, I like Lincoln better.  I feel like Lincoln is more "cradled in Nebraska" (as a whole more) than Omaha.  It is not on the very edge of the state, and with what business goes on there with UNL, the Huskers, and the government, one could argue it has more "center of the state" qualities.  

Omaha is 100% Nebraska, it is Husker country, but being on the very edge of the state, and being the biggest city, I've heard it said that the mentality in Omaha is "Us...and the rest of Nebraska."  I don't think that is entirely true with everybody, but I understand that thinking, growing up in Omaha and the mentality that can exist in the largest city, in a state that is very rural.  

Aaah, good ole' Omaha... Gotta love it.  And, Lincoln, too. (Ultimately, I'm proud NE has two great, clean growing cities, soon tied together by a busy 6-lane interstate!)

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:43 pm

Having recently visited Burlington, VT, that is a town that Lincoln could and should really try to emulate. Very progressive, environmentally aware, the downtown is truly the center of its culture and much daily activity (including tons of big, mainstream retailers), it's a university town and has that great mesh of "small town" and cosmopolitan (kind of like Iowa City).

There is certainly a lot Omaha could learn, too, but in terms of size demographics, it shows that these things are very attainable in a city like Lincoln.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
S33
County Board
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed May 07, 2008 12:15 pm

Postby S33 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:59 pm

StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Having recently visited Burlington, VT, that is a town that Lincoln could and should really try to emulate. Very progressive,
.

Could you elaborate on what is so "progressive" about Burlington, VT? Not trying to bait an argument, just not sure what you mean by progressive.

OmahaBen
Human Relations
Posts: 567
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 1:38 pm

Postby OmahaBen » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:07 pm

StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Having recently visited Burlington, VT, that is a town that Lincoln could and should really try to emulate. Very progressive, environmentally aware, the downtown is truly the center of its culture and much daily activity (including tons of big, mainstream retailers), it's a university town and has that great mesh of "small town" and cosmopolitan (kind of like Iowa City).

There is certainly a lot Omaha could learn, too, but in terms of size demographics, it shows that these things are very attainable in a city like Lincoln.


Except Lincoln's not just a college town; it's also the state capital. And it's much, much bigger than Burlington and even Iowa City, for that matter. I'm not sure how Burlington qualifies as being cosmopolitan with a population of ~40,000 (plus what, 10,000 college students?). Vermont has many good qualities, but being cosmopolitan is not one of them.

Also, if I ever see another Subaru outback/forester with a green Vermont plate going 55 in the left-hand lane of an interstate, it'll be too soon. Those thing infest New Hampshire like the plague.

OmahaBen
Human Relations
Posts: 567
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 1:38 pm

Postby OmahaBen » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:12 pm

S33 wrote:
StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Having recently visited Burlington, VT, that is a town that Lincoln could and should really try to emulate. Very progressive,
.

Could you elaborate on what is so "progressive" about Burlington, VT? Not trying to bait an argument, just not sure what you mean by progressive.


My guess is the fact that it's essentially Boulder, CO, only smaller. Lots of bike lanes, lots of busses that are actually used, heavy pot use (don't even try to argue otherwise), etc.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:53 pm

OmahaBen wrote:
StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Having recently visited Burlington, VT, that is a town that Lincoln could and should really try to emulate. Very progressive, environmentally aware, the downtown is truly the center of its culture and much daily activity (including tons of big, mainstream retailers), it's a university town and has that great mesh of "small town" and cosmopolitan (kind of like Iowa City).

There is certainly a lot Omaha could learn, too, but in terms of size demographics, it shows that these things are very attainable in a city like Lincoln.


Except Lincoln's not just a college town; it's also the state capital. And it's much, much bigger than Burlington and even Iowa City, for that matter. I'm not sure how Burlington qualifies as being cosmopolitan with a population of ~40,000 (plus what, 10,000 college students?). Vermont has many good qualities, but being cosmopolitan is not one of them.

Also, if I ever see another Subaru outback/forester with a green Vermont plate going 55 in the left-hand lane of an interstate, it'll be too soon. Those thing infest New Hampshire like the plague.


Yep, it's both, the capital and college town, so it has a unique thing going on, all its own.  It is also growing.  Very pleasant city, not to big, with plenty of energy and things going on, I feel.  I almost forget that it doesn't have a river (like Omaha), but it almost feels like it should.  I'm so glad NE has two big nice cities, not too far apart, under the banner: "NE: The Good Life."

On the talk of Boulder, Iowa City, and Burlington.  I've never been to Burlington, but I think it looks so beautiful with all the historic buildings and homes on that huge lake, with mountains to the East and West, and all the fiery maples in the fall.  I like Boulder a lot.  I've never been to Iowa City, and I don't think Cedar Rapids either, but I hear good things.  I've been to Dubuque, and I like it (very pretty location).  Des Moines, of course, is also sharp.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8656
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:11 pm

If we are comparing Lincoln to other cities I think they should strive to become more like Madison, Wisconsin.  With Omaha being it's "Milwaukee."  Both are college towns as well as the state capitol.  A lot of influential Lincoln residents will get experience with Madison in the coming years between sporting events and research co-ops between the two universities.  Just my two cents.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:11 pm

iamjacobm wrote:If we are comparing Lincoln to other cities I think they should strive to become more like Madison, Wisconsin.  With Omaha being it's "Milwaukee."  Both are college towns as well as the state capitol.  A lot of influential Lincoln residents will get experience with Madison in the coming years between sporting events and research co-ops between the two universities.  Just my two cents.


Good one... I didn't even think of Madison being like a "Lincoln" with Milwaukee nearby as the "Omaha."  Yeah, Madison is a great town.  I really like Madison and Milwaukee both.  I've been to Madison as a teenager, as I have relatives in Wisconsin.  One of them lives in a house on the lake directly across from the skyline.  I also have spent some time in Milwaukee, and I think of it as a "best kept secret" in Chicago's shadow.  It really has a lot going for it.  It reminds me of a bigger version of Omaha, except on a beautiful lakefront vs. a river, is very leafy and green, with lots of very striking, well-kept historic architecture mixed with sharp new structures  -- and, not to mention, amazing big-city Chicago is a hop, skip, and a jump away.  It is a great Midwest town.  I just like Wisconsin, in general.  Great state.  

(In fact, since I've been away from this board for so long, I have taken tons of pics of Minneapolis, Milwaukee, KC, Chicago, Des Moines, along with Omaha and Lincoln.  I should post them.)

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sat Oct 30, 2010 10:46 am

OmahaBen wrote:Except Lincoln's not just a college town; it's also the state capital. And it's much, much bigger than Burlington and even Iowa City, for that matter. I'm not sure how Burlington qualifies as being cosmopolitan with a population of ~40,000 (plus what, 10,000 college students?).


Burlington is not just a college town either. It's also the state's largest city (the smallest of the largest in the US). When you looked at Burlington's population, did you not see it necessary to check its metro area population? It's about 200,000. Lincoln is hardly "much, much bigger." What it shows is that being cosmopolitan and urban has far less to do with the total population of a city or region and much more to do with neighborhood densities and characteristics, and the attitude of the residents.

S33, I'm using a standard definition of "progressive," chiefly the 2nd definition on dictionary.com, which is as follows:
making progress toward better conditions; employing or advocating more enlightened or liberal ideas, new or experimental methods, etc.: a progressive community.

Here are a few examples. Their city government has a compost system in their city hall. Anything that is biodegradable can be thrown away in designated bins and will be composted (can you imagine Omaha doing this). They have a functional, small-scale public transit system which is heavily used. They have high bicycle and pedestrian modeshare. Their historic preservation efforts and ordinances are among the strongest in the Nation, if not topping the list. It's also brimming with green industries and businesses. Did you know Seventh Generation (green cleaning products) was started and is headquartered in Burlington? We also toured Magic Hat brewery, which is the first brewery in the U.S. and possibly the world to innovate its own system that takes the organic waist from beer-making and transforms it into methane using anaerobic processes, which is then used to run the heaters and machines of the brewery - their goal is to be completely energy self-sufficient.

Those are just a few of the things I gleaned while there on a visit with UAlbany's Graduate Planning Student Association.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sat Oct 30, 2010 7:34 pm

^  Wow, Burlington sounds so "green" and progressive.  I had no idea.  Vermont is such a beautiful state altogether.  StreetsofOmaha:  So, you're in Albany now I see, after Quebec City.  Interesting...  I've driven through that town years ago.  I almost was in upstate NY this last summer to see my cousin get married up on a lake north of Albany.  However, I didn't make it to the wedding.  That's a pretty part of the country.

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sun Oct 31, 2010 11:02 am

Hey RockHarbor. Yes, I just moved to Albany and will be here for two years or so while I complete a master's degree in urban and regional planning. I didn't really "live" in Quebec, but was there for a summer French program in 2005. This will be the longest I've lived away from Omaha (after six months in France in 2008), but I'm Omaha through and through.  :)
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:02 pm

StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Hey RockHarbor. Yes, I just moved to Albany and will be here for two years or so while I complete a master's degree in urban and regional planning. I didn't really "live" in Quebec, but was there for a summer French program in 2005. This will be the longest I've lived away from Omaha (after six months in France in 2008), but I'm Omaha through and through.  :)


That's awesome to hear!  Congrats!  Well, I hope when you attain your degree, you come back here and put your talents and education to use.  I think you would be awesome in helping plan and develop Omaha for the better (of course).  As far as being "Omaha through and through":  Yes, I don't care where you move, where you go, if you're from Nebraska, and Omaha, and grew up here, you can't completely let it go (it seems).  There are so many great things about the Cornhusker State.

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sun Oct 31, 2010 8:45 pm

Thanks RockHarbor. Omaha is definitely what inspired me at a young age to care about cities, and it would be my dream come true to be able to make a career out of working to make it a better city.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:37 pm

StreetsOfOmaha wrote:Thanks RockHarbor. Omaha is definitely what inspired me at a young age to care about cities, and it would be my dream come true to be able to make a career out of working to make it a better city.


Yep... You would make a great city planner for Omaha (or any city).  I can totally relate to you.  Growing up, I remember being so excited to see "Midlands News" on Sunday to see if anything new was going to be built in town.  Back then, I had no idea Omaha had so many souls excited over the same type stuff.  If you like to monitor growth and develop, I feel Omaha is a great size town to "oversee" easily.  It changes fast enough to satisfy, and is not so big that you can't keep track of any/all new growth & development on any side of town.

nativeomahan
Planning Board
Posts: 3429
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:46 pm
Location: Omaha

Postby nativeomahan » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:49 pm

I've been to Burlington, and loved it for all of the reasons mentioned above.  Compact, vibrant, historic, picturesque.  Lake Champlain is a gem.  Boulder is also fantastic, particularly for those under 40.  The mountains are at your back door, and Denver practically across the street.
Never been to Madison, or Milwaukee.  They are both on my "bucket list."
Every city is unique.  Every city has it's own vibe.  Some are more fun than others, to be sure.  There is no perfect city, as different places appeal to different demographics.  Omaha is far from a perfect city from my perspective.  But it has a lot going for it...more than ever before.  It has most of my friends and family, which is a big part of why I like it here.  I do hate the winters (for the most part).  And the lack of large bodies of water is a downer.  But for day-to-day living this is a very comfortable city.  Lincoln is nice, too.  Very clean.  Just not much of an urban vibe.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Mon Nov 01, 2010 11:17 am

nativeomahan wrote: Every city is unique.  Every city has it's own vibe.  Some are more fun than others, to be sure.  There is no perfect city, as different places appeal to different demographics.  Omaha is far from a perfect city from my perspective.  But it has a lot going for it...more than ever before.  It has most of my friends and family, which is a big part of why I like it here.  I do hate the winters (for the most part).  And the lack of large bodies of water is a downer.  But for day-to-day living this is a very comfortable city.  Lincoln is nice, too.  Very clean.  Just not much of an urban vibe.


I feel a lot the same way...

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:31 pm

In Lincoln's paper yesterday, on the front page, there was an article about a new 10-story building going up downtown.  It sounds really nice...

Here, I found the article online!:  

http://journalstar.com/news/local/article_9df94aa0-fd86-11de-aa15-001cc4c002e0.html  

What a great design!

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8656
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:37 pm

Just about to ask for a link thanks!

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:41 pm

iamjacobm wrote:Just about to ask for a link thanks!


No problem!  I'm glad I looked it up just now, because the paper yesterday didn't have a rendering that I saw...  That rendering there, though, of Assurity Life, doesn't look 9-10 stories.  It must be a different building going up (because the one featured in the paper was mixed-use, I think).

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8656
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:42 pm

LJS
"I think Lincoln's pretty conservative, so in our recent history we haven't had anyone that's just gone crazy and overbuilt," he said. "Fourteen units is not like in Omaha when hundreds hit the market and really killed the market."


Taken out of that article.  Taking a little swipe at big brother.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:48 pm

iamjacobm wrote:LJS
"I think Lincoln's pretty conservative, so in our recent history we haven't had anyone that's just gone crazy and overbuilt," he said. "Fourteen units is not like in Omaha when hundreds hit the market and really killed the market."


Taken out of that article.  Taking a little swipe at big brother.


Omaha and Lincoln just need to get along and respect each other -- and grow together to make one giant urban area.  Seattle-Tacoma, Dallas-Fort Worth, Miami-Fort Lauderdale, and Minneapolis-St. Paul don't get to have all the fun....  (just being dumb...lol)

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:22 pm

Haha. "Killed the market." Well, if that's how they need to justify their lack of development...  :;):

RockHarbor, Omaha and Lincoln will never make one urban area (sprawl is dead). However, with better transportation connections and economic cooperation, they could combine to create a thriving, vibrant region.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

StreetsOfOmaha
City Council
Posts: 6936
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:46 pm

Postby StreetsOfOmaha » Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:24 pm

The Assurity Life HQ building shown in the article looks like it would be in any anonymous suburban office park - not in an urban, downtown setting. But I guess from Lincoln's perspective, any downtown development is good downtown development.
"The right to have access to every building in the city by private motorcar in an age when everyone possesses such a vehicle is actually the right to destroy the city."
Lewis Mumford, The Highway and the City, 1963

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:44 pm

StreetsOfOmaha wrote: RockHarbor, Omaha and Lincoln will never make one urban area (sprawl is dead). However, with better transportation connections and economic cooperation, they could combine to create a thriving, vibrant region.


Good point.  Yet, having a big, modern international airport halfway between the two cities, and some thriving suburbs scattered between the two, does sound kinda neat to me.  But, yes, it is almost hard to imagine them completely connected.

THaha. "Killed the market." Well, if that's how they need to justify their lack of development...  :;):


The Assurity Life HQ building shown in the article looks like it would be in any anonymous suburban office park - not in an urban, downtown setting. But I guess from Lincoln's perspective, any downtown development is good downtown development.


Streets...that is not very nice.  Lincoln has feelings, too.  :)  (lol...just kidding.)  I actually like how Lincoln has a tidy, organized downtown, very busy, very active, kinda of centered around the tall, historic-gem-of-a-Capitol Building.  I like the thought of high-tech, sharp buildings going up, not necessarily trying to dazzle people with significant height or a change to the skyline silhouette.  There are really some nice buildings in downtown Lincoln, and I look forward to seeing more built (along with Omaha).
Last edited by RockHarbor on Mon Nov 08, 2010 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8656
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Sun Nov 07, 2010 7:58 pm

RockHarbor:  I would much rather see Epplely expand and have some light rail connecting Lincoln to it than having a brand new airport in between the two.  But I can see a town like Ashland becoming a mutual bedroom community to both cities.  As well as Lincoln expanding to the east.  Not saying they will be close enough to consider one metro, but close enough to consider one general region.  I do agree about Lincoln's downtown it perfectly compliments the city with it's modest size, but great use of what it has.

I think it is moving toward the capitol which will help, but downtown and the capitol feel like two different areas maybe some of these new projects will help connect the two though.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Sun Nov 07, 2010 8:28 pm

iamjacobm wrote:RockHarbor:  I would much rather see Epplely expand and have some light rail connecting Lincoln to it than having a brand new airport in between the two.  But I can see a town like Ashland becoming a mutual bedroom community to both cities.  As well as Lincoln expanding to the east.  Not saying they will be close enough to consider one metro, but close enough to consider one general region.  I do agree about Lincoln's downtown it perfectly compliments the city with it's modest size, but great use of what it has.

I think it is moving toward the capitol which will help, but downtown and the capitol feel like two different areas maybe some of these new projects will help connect the two though.


Yeah, I like Eppley Airfield, so I was thinking that, too, when I said my comment.  I think having an airport inbetween Omaha and Lincoln, that far from both downtowns, would even make the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Denver International Airport look not-so-far out...  It would be too far.

Yeah, I think of Ashland as a perfect midway point suburban area, with some modern conveniences near the state parks...

I know what you mean about the Capitol Building being a bit set apart from downtown.  I think of it all being "downtown", but the Capitol Building really is on the far south end (literally, streets of homes start just south of the building).  When I said downtown was "centered" around the Capitol Building, I think I was thinking more of it as the "pinnacle" of downtown, with its height and distinct shape.

Yes, downtown Lincoln is a delight in many ways.  I enjoy being down there, with all the stores and businesses.  It's very nice...  And, I like seeing both Omaha and Lincoln progress.  

-- --------------------------------------------

Capital and Capitol...always easy to get those mixed up (for me).  That stops today:  I'll just remember the extra 'A' stands for the alphabet, when using the word to mean a letter being capitalized.  The 'O" is the correct spelling for a government building, the 'O' being the same round shape of the Nation's Capitol Building in DC.  :)

User avatar
Stargazer
County Board
Posts: 3913
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:06 am
Location: west Omaha

Postby Stargazer » Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:18 pm

Eppley... just a hop-skip-and a jump away from downtown Omaha is a real asset, I'd hate to give up.

User avatar
RockHarbor
Human Relations
Posts: 760
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:42 am
Location: Omaha

Postby RockHarbor » Tue Nov 09, 2010 10:39 pm

Stargazer wrote:Eppley... just a hop-skip-and a jump away from downtown Omaha is a real asset, I'd hate to give up.


Yeah, especially with the view of downtown Omaha from the airport now.  I love that skyline view from Abbot Drive, as it meanders south towards the skyline.  The FNC looks so tall from there (imo).

User avatar
iamjacobm
City Council
Posts: 8656
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:52 am
Location: Midtown

Postby iamjacobm » Mon Jun 17, 2013 7:35 pm

http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/don-walton-lincoln-omaha-on-different-paths/article_18529b9c-f67f-5a25-84b0-b83c8b7ddcd7.html

Without pretending to be thoroughly informed or knowledgeable about all of Omaha's needs and challenges, it seems to me it will be instructive to view how Stothert's determination to squeeze taxes and spending works in terms of city services and investments in the future as well as obligations and debts already incurred.

Maybe a Mayor Beutler works best for this point in Lincoln's history, when the city is alive and surging forward after a long siesta, with its eyes focused on progress and growth.  

Perhaps a Mayor Stothert will work for Omaha after a decade of growth and development.

Let's keep an eye on this tale of two cities and see what happens.

MadMartin8
Planning Board
Posts: 2010
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:48 pm
Location: Beyond Thunderdome

Postby MadMartin8 » Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:56 pm

iamjacobm wrote:http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/don-walton-lincoln-omaha-on-different-paths/article_18529b9c-f67f-5a25-84b0-b83c8b7ddcd7.html

Without pretending to be thoroughly informed or knowledgeable about all of Omaha's needs and challenges, it seems to me it will be instructive to view how Stothert's determination to squeeze taxes and spending works in terms of city services and investments in the future as well as obligations and debts already incurred.

Maybe a Mayor Beutler works best for this point in Lincoln's history, when the city is alive and surging forward after a long siesta, with its eyes focused on progress and growth.  

Perhaps a Mayor Stothert will work for Omaha after a decade of growth and development.

Let's keep an eye on this tale of two cities and see what happens.



That made no sense whatsoever. I mean, I'm not the sharpest knife in the crayon box, but to say that Lincoln is some bastion of forward spending habits with infrastructure and development...yet Omaha is going backward....sorry "on a different path", is interesting to say the least. Just because Lincoln finally is playing catch-up to all the cities around it doesn't mean the other cities including Omaha are going backwards..whoops again.. "on a different path". Look at the development in the Old Market, TD Ameritrade, the Cancer Center, etc.  Somehow building a beltway that was needed 20 years ago gives the right to look down upon cities that have been there and are going places as well, I guess? It's a thinly veiled criticism on Omaha, and especially Stothert, all while trying to use the guise of some wise observer.
No posts exist for this topic


Return to “Lincoln”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest